Dunbar Critter Dinner celebrates 50th year

Game on the plate, votes on the line

A Critter Dinner plate/ Photos by Davina van Buren
A Critter Dinner plate/ Photos by Davina van Buren
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In the 1970s, West Virginia had a law that required residents to either consume or dispose of animals hunted the previous season by the last weekend of February. To combat food waste, then-Dunbar mayor Frank Leone started a program where residents could bring their game meat to a central location in the city to feed senior citizens at a community luncheon.

“Back then, it was a lot of roadkill, and he would also get critters that people had killed all over the U.S.—elk, bear, raccoon, anything and everything,” explained Dunbar mayor Scott Elliott, who was one of 350 attendees at the 50th Annual Dunbar Critter Dinner on April 6.

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