Cheap butter will spoil the batter

Plus, a dry steakhouse in Conway, SC

965586a2-9ba8-4246-baab-4d6ee7d4c916_3024x2203
Avatar photo
Avatar photo

There are plenty of recipes in Ida Rowe’s unpublished cookery journal, including one for homemade fainting salts, but the late Tifton, Georgia resident’s general kitchen wisdom might have the most value for contemporary cooks.

Polly Huff of the Georgia Museum of Agriculture came across Ida Rowe’s log when browsing the museum’s collection for an upcoming exhibit: It was marked as a cookbook donated in 1979. By puzzling out partial records associated with the object, including a Globe, Arizona steam laundry receipt tucked inside it, Huff determined the private journal traveled to the U.S. with Rowe when she immigrated from Cornwall, England in the 1910s.

blue-line

This Article is included for subscribers to South Edition and our All-Access Plan.

BECOME A SUBSCRIBER

Help us cover food and drink across the American South as though it mattered as much as crime and politics (because it does.)