Seeding better communication

Plant breeders just want to be understood

Michael Kantar set up a table at the National Association of Plant Breeders’ meeting and urged attendees to share their research stories with the general public/ Photos by Hanna Raskin
Michael Kantar set up a table at the National Association of Plant Breeders’ meeting and urged attendees to share their research stories with the general public/ Photos by Hanna Raskin
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At the National Association of Plant Breeders’ annual meeting, which was held last week in Greenville, South Carolina, there are two ways for researchers to present their findings. They can speak from the dais, as I did as the conference’s keynote speaker, or they can participate in the event’s poster session.1

The poster session is exactly like a grade school science fair, with each display detailing an experiment and its results. Except in this case, the posters are so arcane that even someone who aced organic chem in college could be forgiven for not knowing if a sheet was hung right side up.   

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